This is totally late, but this is my blurb for The Cinefamily’s screening of Peter Watkins’ pseudo-doc about the US-as-police-state Punishment Park. 
An astonishing all-American dystopia that’s both terrifyingly realistic and fantastically hyperbolic, Peter Watkins’ masterpiece Punishment Park melts down the righteous anger of Vietnam protest politics into a nail-biting flow of pure narrative propulsion. In the film’s chilling “what-if” scenario, a uniformly groovy panoply of subversives (featuring pacifists, feminists, professors, draft dodgers and pop stars) stand in resistance against repressive establishment squares at a lethal government-sponsored kangaroo court — but survival soon trumps articulateness, as the prisoners are plunged into the deepest levels of hell right in the open air: a grueling, Most Dangerous Game-style desert death race with no food or water, but plenty of ticked-off cops. Shot guerilla-style on 16mm in a Mojave Desert dry lake bed, this docudrama trailblazer is unforgiving, raw, and scorching, and features shocking performances from its non-professional actors, who were cast primarily for their ability to speak on-camera about their real-life political beliefs. While insightfully awash in Seventies counterculture, Punishment Park is no time capsule, for what’s most terrifying is how relevant its alternate-reality police state still feels forty years later.

This is totally late, but this is my blurb for The Cinefamily’s screening of Peter Watkins’ pseudo-doc about the US-as-police-state Punishment Park

An astonishing all-American dystopia that’s both terrifyingly realistic and fantastically hyperbolic, Peter Watkins’ masterpiece Punishment Park melts down the righteous anger of Vietnam protest politics into a nail-biting flow of pure narrative propulsion. In the film’s chilling “what-if” scenario, a uniformly groovy panoply of subversives (featuring pacifists, feminists, professors, draft dodgers and pop stars) stand in resistance against repressive establishment squares at a lethal government-sponsored kangaroo court — but survival soon trumps articulateness, as the prisoners are plunged into the deepest levels of hell right in the open air: a grueling, Most Dangerous Game-style desert death race with no food or water, but plenty of ticked-off cops. Shot guerilla-style on 16mm in a Mojave Desert dry lake bed, this docudrama trailblazer is unforgiving, raw, and scorching, and features shocking performances from its non-professional actors, who were cast primarily for their ability to speak on-camera about their real-life political beliefs. While insightfully awash in Seventies counterculture, Punishment Park is no time capsule, for what’s most terrifying is how relevant its alternate-reality police state still feels forty years later.

I interviewed Todd Solondz!

The director of Happiness, Welcome to the Doll House, and Storytelling. Aack!

http://www.tinymixtapes.com/features/todd-solondz

Here’s a list of the 15 best films of 2012 (so far) that I helped put together at Tiny Mix Tapes. I’m super excited: this mid-year list is better than most year-end lists will be. Go watch all of these, like, now.

http://www.tinymixtapes.com/features/favorite-15-films-of-2012-so-far

Here’s a list of the 15 best films of 2012 (so far) that I helped put together at Tiny Mix Tapes. I’m super excited: this mid-year list is better than most year-end lists will be. Go watch all of these, like, now.

http://www.tinymixtapes.com/features/favorite-15-films-of-2012-so-far

Tags: cats

RIP Lucifer AKA Lucy, 1995-2012. He’s on the left. 

RIP Lucifer AKA Lucy, 1995-2012. He’s on the left. 

(Source: ddevotion, via arvidabystrom)

Plastic Bertrand. “Ça plane pour moi,” 1977.

Prometheus

I reviewed Prometheus at Tiny Mix Tapes. Basically, the gist is: don’t believe the haterz. The film, and Noomi Rapace, kicks some ass.

http://www.tinymixtapes.com/film/prometheus

I wrote about American composer John Luther Adams’s seminal experimental percussion piece, Inuksuit, which was recently performed in Ojai. It’s a pretty amazing piece of music, with both its percussionists and audience members moving all over natural landscapes as it explores the relationship between our physical and sonic environments. Here’s the article:

http://vcreporter.com/cms/story/detail/?id=9887

I’ve always wanted to be that blog where people freaked out if I followed them.

(Source: neymarhorans, via santaclouse)